Math in Room 213

Mrs. Coyle's Math Classes                     2018- 2019

 

2018-19 School Calendar

MATH Pathways

 

Your Math PORTFOLIO:

All your assignments, tests, and quizzes along with unmarked items will be kept in your folder in room 213.  These items in your folder are not allowed to leave room 213, but will be given to you in its entirety at the end of the course. 

 

 

How to get extra time on assignments? 

(1)   Room 213 during lunch (Monday to Friday) - no appointment necessary. 

(2)   After school in the Learning Commons (Monday to Friday)  Please make
       arrangements
 with me in advance and I will bring your folder to the Learning
       Commons.

  

 

 

 Achievement Chart:

Categories 50-59%
(Level 1)
60-69%
(Level 2)
70-79%
(Level 3)
80-100%
(Level 4)
Knowledge/ Understanding - Subject-specific content acquired in each course (knowledge), and the comprehension of its meaning and significance (understanding)
The student:
Knowledge of content (e.g., facts, terms, definitions)demonstrates limited knowledge of contentdemonstrates some knowledge of contentdemonstrates considerable knowledge of contentdemonstrates thorough knowledge of content
Understanding of content (e.g., concepts, ideas, theories, procedures, processes, methodologies, and/or technologies)demonstrates limited understanding of contentdemonstrates some understanding of contentdemonstrates considerable understanding of contentdemonstrates thorough and insightful understanding of content
Thinking/ Inquiring - The use of critical and creative thinking skills and/or processes
The student:
Use of planning skills (e.g., focusing research, gathering information, organizing an inquiry, asking questions, setting goals)uses planning skills with limited effectivenessuses planning skills with moderate effectiveness uses planning skills with considerable effectiveness uses planning skills with a high degree of effectiveness
Use of processing skills (e.g., inquiry process, problem-solving process, decision-making process, research process)uses processing skills with limited effectivenessuses processing skills with some effectivenessuses processing skills with considerable effectivenessuses processing skills with a high degree of effectiveness
Use of critical/creative thinking processes (e.g., oral discourse, research, critical analysis, critical literacy, metacognition, creative process)uses critical / creative thinking processes with limited effectivenessuses critical / creative thinking processes with some effectivenessuses critical / creative thinking processes with considerable effectivenessuses critical / creative thinking processes with a high degree of effectiveness
Communication - The conveying of meaning through various forms
The student:
Expression and organization of ideas and information (e.g., clear expression, logical organization) in oral, graphic, and written forms, including media formsexpresses and organizes ideas and information with limited effectivenessexpresses and organizes ideas and information with some effectivenessexpresses and organizes ideas and information with considerable effectivenessexpresses and organizes ideas and information with a high degree of effectiveness
Communication for different audiences (e.g., peers, adults) and purposes (e.g., to inform, to persuade) in oral, written, and visual formscommunicates for different audiences and purposes with limited effectivenesscommunicates for different audiences and purposes with some effectivenesscommunicates for different audiences and purposes with considerable effectivenesscommunicates for different audiences and purposes with a high degree of effectiveness
Use of conventions (e.g., conventions of form, map conventions), vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline in oral, written, and visual formsuses conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with limited effectivenessuses conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with some effectivenessuses conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with considerable effectivenessuses conventions, vocabulary, and terminology of the discipline with a high degree of effectiveness
Application - The use of knowledge and skills to make connections within and between various contexts
The student:
Application of knowledge and skills (e.g., concepts, procedures, processes, and/or technologies) in familiar contextsapplies knowledge and skills in familiar contexts with limited effectivenessapplies knowledge and skills in familiar contexts with some effectivenessapplies knowledge and skills in familiar contexts with considerable effectivenessapplies knowledge and skills in familiar contexts with a high degree of effectiveness
Transfer of knowledge and skills (e.g., concepts, procedures, methodologies, technologies) to new contextstransfers knowledge and skills to new contexts with limited effectivenesstransfers knowledge and skills to new contexts with some effectivenesstransfers knowledge and skills to new contexts with considerable effectivenesstransfers knowledge and skills to new contexts with a high degree of effectiveness
Making connections within and between various contexts (e.g., past, present, and future; environmental; social; cultural; spatial; personal; multidisciplinary)makes connections within and between various contexts with limited effectivenessmakes connections within and between various contexts with some effectivenessmakes connections within and between various contexts with considerable effectivenessmakes connections within and between various contexts with a high degree of effectiveness

 

Assessment and Evaluation Strategies of Student Performance:

Assessment is a systematic process of collecting information or evidence about a student’s progress towards meeting the learning expectations. Assessment is embedded in the instructional activities throughout a unit. The expectations for the assessment tasks are clearly articulated and the learning activity is planned to make that demonstration possible. This process of beginning with the end in mind helps to keep focus on the expectations of the course. The purpose of assessment is to gather the data or evidence and to provide meaningful feedback to the student about how to improve or sustain the performance in the course. Scaled criteria designed as rubrics are often used to help the student to recognize their level of achievement and to provide guidance on how to achieve the next level. Although assessment information can be gathered from a number of sources (the student himself, the student’s course mates, the teacher), evaluation is the responsibility of only the teacher. For evaluation is the process of making a judgment about the assessment information and determining the percentage grade or level.

Assessment is embedded within the instructional process throughout each unit rather than being an isolated event at the end. Often, the learning and assessment tasks are the same, with formative assessment provided throughout the unit. In every case, the desired demonstration of learning is articulated clearly and the learning activity is planned to make that demonstration possible. This process of beginning with the end in mind helps to keep focus on the expectations of the course as stated in the course guideline. The evaluations are expressed as a percentage based upon the levels of achievement.

The Final Grade:

The evaluation of the student’s achievement in this course is based on the student’s achievement of the curriculum expectations. The percentage grade represents the student’s overall achievement and reflects the corresponding level of achievement as described in the Achievement chart for this discipline. A credit will be granted if the final percentage awarded is 50% or more. The final grade for this course will be determined as follows:

  • 70% of the grade will be based upon assessment tasks completed throughout the course. This portion of the grade will reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration will be given to the most recent evidence of achievement.  All assessment tasks, such as assignments, quizzes, tests, etc. will be done and completed in class under the supervision of your teacher.
  • 30% of the grade will be based on a final assessment task that occurs at or near the end of the course. In the case of this course, this final assessment task will take the form of a final examination which will be completed online under the supervision of a pre-approved proctor. The exam is worth 30% of the student’s final mark in the course.

The Report Card:

The report card will focus on two distinct but related components of student achievement: the achievement of curriculum expectations and the development of learning skills. The report card will contain separate sections for the reporting of these two aspects.

 

Literacy, Mathematical Literacy, and Investigation (Inquiry/Research) Skills

Communication skills are fundamental to the development of mathematical literacy. Fostering students’ communication skills is an important part of the teacher’s role in the math curriculum. When reading in mathematics, students use a different set of skills than they do when reading fiction or general non-fiction. They need to understand vocabulary and terminology that are unique to mathematics, and must be able to interpret symbols, charts, diagrams, and graphs. In all math courses, students are expected to use appropriate and correct terminology, and are encouraged to use language with care and precision in order to communicate effectively. Math courses also encourage students to communicate with precision in order to communicate effectively. Students are encouraged throughout their online mathematics course to ask questions to their peers and teacher and, as well, to become proactive in the solving of their own questions through investigations.

The Role of Technology in Mathematics

Information and communication technology (ICT) is considered a learning tool that must be accessed by Mathematics students when the situation is appropriate. As a result, students will develop transferable skills through their experience with word processing, internet research, presentation software, and equation editors as might be expected in any environment. By using ICT tools, the students will be able to reduce the time required to perform mundane or repetitive tasks thus creating more time to be spent on higher order tasks such as thinking or concept development. The nature of the online course itself, with students enrolled from all over the world, brings the global community into the classroom.

Career Education in Mathematics

Mathematics definitely helps prepare students for employment in a huge number of diverse areas - Engineering, Science, Business, etc. The skills, knowledge and creativity that students acquire through this course are essential for a wide range of careers. Being able to express oneself in a clear concise manner without ambiguity, solve problems, make connections between this Mathematics course and the larger world, etc., would be an overall intention of this Mathematics course, as it helps students prepare for success in their working lives.

Teaching / Learning Strategies:

Since the over-riding aim of this course is to help students use the language of mathematics skillfully, confidently and flexibly, a wide variety of instructional strategies are used to provide learning opportunities to accommodate a variety of learning styles, interests and ability levels.

Seven mathematical processes will form the heart of the teaching and learning strategies used.

Communicating: To improve student success there will be several opportunities for students to share their understanding both in oral as well as written form.

Problem solving: Scaffolding of knowledge, detecting patterns, making and justifying conjectures, guiding students as they apply their chosen strategy, directing students to use multiple strategies to solve the same problem, when appropriate, recognizing, encouraging, and applauding perseverance, discussing the relative merits of different strategies for specific types of problems.

Reasoning and proving: Asking questions that get students to hypothesize, providing students with one or more numerical examples that parallel these with the generalization and describing their thinking in more detail.

Reflecting: Modeling the reflective process, asking students how they know.

Selecting Tools and Computational Strategies: Modeling the use of tools and having students use technology to help solve problems.

Connecting: Activating prior knowledge when introducing a new concept in order to make a smooth connection between previous learning and new concepts, and introducing skills in context to make connections between particular manipulations and problems that require them.

Representing: Modeling various ways to demonstrate understanding, posing questions that require students to use different representations as they are working at each level of conceptual development – concrete, visual or symbolic, allowing individual students the time they need to solidify their understanding at each conceptual stage.